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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
. that would include things like infrastructure, education, r&d. >> rose: science exploration. >> rose: and we spent about 30% on transfer payments to the elderly. >> we now spend 68% on transfer payments but investments are down to 15%. so i think to larry's point, what did we get out of the investment? well, we got the internet. we got g.p.s., we got the human genome. >> rose: so that's where you agree with him. >> i totally agree. and if you look at the sequester -- >> rose: that the investments are worthwhile and important and crucial to our future. >> yes, but we are cutting the investments so we can continue to let transfer payments to the elderly grow at a very rapid rate. we cannot do both. >> rose: or we're cutting the investments because we do not have a realistic look at where taxes-- which you're prepared to have a real itselfic look at. yes? in other words, you're not coming here as a representative a view often expressed by the 30 members of congress, although you had reservations about the health fund, defunding the health care even though you expressed riz reservations about it
's not true in europe. >> rose: and falling behind in scores on math and science and engineering! >> rose: >> and also 25 years ago if you were a dropout you could work a lathe or a press, there were lots of jobs. you didn't even have to speak english. today there's low level jobs at fast food restaurants and hospitals but if you want to get a decent job that's challenging and fun you have to be able to use a computer. you have to speak in english. all these manuals are all in -- they're not in creole, they're not in portuguese, they're not in spanish. they're in english. so today being a dropout is a tragedy. it shouldn't be happening. >> rose: once you lose a step, you lose a second step and third step and fourth step. >> and literacy. there's an amazing correlation, the couple million people in prison, 85% of them are illiterate. not their fault. >> rose: here's the thing for me. the people -- you and so many people i know-- some deceased, some in youth, some -- but all passionate about education, passionate all have resources, all have a voice. why aren't we fixing this? >> i think fi
filtered through the imagination. the birds was as close as he got to science fiction. you need a detail that is extraordinary. .he lady vanishes he needs the lady vanishing. >> you have said horror has been .iven a bad reputation >> i think what i want is varied that whatever genre is sincere. at some point we started with and quickly followed. they are so beautiful these presentations. .e spent weeks it was very satisfactory and beautiful. >> the paying would series, what is that? i was asked to write a new introduction. it was very well storied. i wanted to show some of the genre.xamples of the we were reintroducing an offer that was very neglected. that was very neglected and was out of print for a long time. to write a primer for people buying that collection for the first time. brothers worken together. collaborating.o >> or we would create a great story of murder because we would murder each other. the idea of collaborating, every time i visit his editing room, it is his editing room. you don't put three in the same project. there is only one. brothers can do it. else are you work
their parents. that is remarkable. >> and falling behind in scores on math. and science. engineering. >> 25 years ago, if you are a ,ropout, you could work a lathe a bowling machine. there are a lot of jobs. jobs, there is low level at fast food restaurants and hospitals. if you want a decent job, you have to use a computer. you have to speaking wish. all of these manuals, they are not in creole or portuguese. spanish. they are in english. today being a dropout is a tragedy. yound once you lose a step, lose a second and third and fourth step. >> and literacy. there is this amazing correlation. 80 for -- 85% of people in prison are illiterate. >> you and so many people i know use,e deceased, some in but all passionate about education. passionate. all have resources. all have a voice. all, one of the issues is recognizing the problem. i do not think it was clear 10, 20 years ago. when world war ii started, our army was smothered in the netherlands. we did not know how bad hitler was. he have to recognize that. now we say, there are 45 million kids in public school. decent them get a education
the sport they began understanding -- >> rose: peter did? >> peter morgan as sort of the science of the overtake in formula one which is different than nascar. it's something you have to wait for. >> rose: how do you get around the car. >> right. and he tried to define their lives. he didn't just interview some people and throw the facts together, he was able to design a narrative that is a serious overtaking. i think it's another thing that really surprises audience is that, you know, you never quite see what's coming next. >> rose: what's amazing to me also is here is a guy who can calculate, lauda. he took a risk and he said he wanted to get out of a race because he thought the risk was too great. too damn high to continue so he pulls out. >> well, again, he was a -- he always thought, i think in the long term and a great overview and hunt was forever in the moment, whether he was on the track, whether he was in a club, whether he was home, wherever he was, very gifted man and, as i said, both entirely authentic. >> rose: so niki lauda realizes he's beginning to find some comf
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)